aseh/newberry library fellowship for 2019

 

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If you are researching the environment and humanities, the Newberry Library has something for you!

The Newberry is proud to host a residential fellowship sponsored by the ASEH.

 

The Newberry is an internationally renowned independent research library, which offers an extensive collection of rare books, maps, music, manuscripts, and other printed materials spanning six centuries. The maps, published texts, manuscripts, art and photography, and ephemera could be particularly useful to topics in environmental history. Newberry fellowships provide assistance to researchers who wish to use our collection. We promise you intriguing and often rare materials; a lively, interdisciplinary community of researchers; individual consultations on your research with staff curators, librarians, and other scholars; and an array of both scholarly and public programs.

The Newberry Library-American Society for Environmental History (ASEH) Fellowship is available to scholars working in environmental history and demonstrate a specific need for the Newberry’s collection. Applicants within the Chicago metropolitan area are eligible. Applicants must be members of the American Society for Environmental History in good standing at the time of application and, if awarded, through the period of their award.The monthly stipend for this fellowship is $2,500. For more information, visit the Newberry's website: www.newberry.org/short-term-fellowships

Application Deadline: December 15, 2018

Research and Academic Programs, The Newberry Library, 60 West Walton Street | Chicago, IL 60610, 312-255-3666 | research@newberry.org

The 2017 recipient of this fellowship is Katherine Walker (University of North Carolina) for her project Reading the Natural and Preternatural Worlds in Early Modern Drama

The 2016 recipient of this fellowship was Zachary Nowak
(PhD Candidate in History at Harvard University) for his project 
The American Train Station: An Environmental History.

The 2015 recipient of this fellowship was Jennifer Saracino (PhD Candidate - Art History - Tulane University) for her project, Shifting Landscape: Depictions of Environmental and Cultural Disruption in the Mapa Uppsala of Mexico-Tenochitlan.